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World Obesity: What next for European action on childhood obesity? Last chance to register

Childhood obesity is a major health problem in Europe, with dire long-term consequences for our health, society, and the economy.

Current trends indicate that there will be over 10 million children in the region affected by obesity in 2030. At the same time, initiatives such as the EU Farm to Fork StrategyEurope’s Beating Cancer Plan and the European Child Guarantee present many opportunities for action.

Organised in the framework of the Science and Technology in Childhood Obesity Policy project, join World Obesity for an interactive debate to discuss the best approaches and interventions which should be presented to the European Commission as input into the next version of the EU’s Action Plan on Childhood Obesity.

•             Date: 12 October 2021

•             Time: 15:00 – 16:00 CEST

Speakers include:

•             Franco Sassi, Consortium Lead, STOP project, Imperial College London

•             Jacqueline Bowman-Busato, EU Policy Lead, European Association for the Study of Obesity

•             Knut-Inge Klepp, Consortium Lead, CO-CREATE project, Norwegian Institute of Public Health

•             Milka Sokolović, Director General, European Public Health Alliance (EPHA)

•             Kremlin Wickramasinghe, Technical Officer, World Health Organization

•             Sara Cerdas, Member of European Parliament, Co-chair of the EP Working Group on Public Health

You can learn more about the event here.

Image by congerdesign from Pixabay

IUNS at Conxemar – FAO Congress

The importance of including omega-3 fatty acids in the diet is an important factor in disease prevention and can  prevent  alterations in genomic expression.  J Alfredo Martinez, IUNS President, recently  presented “Prevention of alterations in genomic expression: the importance of fish in diets” at this year’s joint Conxemar-FAO Congress.

Conxemar, the Spanish Association of Wholesalers, Importers, Manufacturers and Exporters of fish products and Aquaculture, in collaboration with FAO, held the ninth edition of its congress in Vigo, Spain, with focus on the role of fish in nutrition and food systems on October 4, 2021.

You can learn more about the event and view the presentations here.

FAO Consultation: Guidelines on Gender Equality and Women’s and Girls Empowerment in the context of Food Security and Nutrition”

FAO would like to renew their invitation to the online “Consultation for the development of the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Gender Equality and Women’s and Girls’ Empowerment in the Context of Food Security and Nutrition“.

This activity is facilitated by Françoise Trine, Marina Calvino and Alyson Brody from the Secretariat of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), who invite you to provide your feedback on the Zero Draft of the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Gender Equality and Women’s and Girls’ Empowerment in the Context of Food Security and Nutrition.

TO PARTICIPATE – send your contribution to fsn-moderator@fao.org or post it on www.fao.org/fsnforum

Update on the Europe and Central Asia CFS Gender Regional Consultation

The CFS Gender Regional Consultation for Europe and Central Asia took place on 27-28 September. This was the second one of the series of six consultations planned to take place in September-November 2021. This Consultation was also very well attended by around 90 participants and more following the webcast. The plenary discussions saw the contributions of all CFS constituent groups: representatives from governments, UN System, civil society, research institutions, private sector and others, sharing precious information on challenges and potential solutions to align the future CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Gender Equality and Women’s and Girls’ Empowerment in the Context of Food Security and Nutrition with national and regional priorities and needs.

Ms Tanja Grén (Finland) and Mr Tomas Duncan Jurado (Panama), Co-Chairs appointed by the CFS Bureau to facilitate the policy convergence process, presented the Zero Draft of the Guidelines, the main background document for the consultation.

The plenary discussion was inspired by three keynote speakers: H.E. Ms Narbaeva Tanzila Kamalovna [1], Chairperson of the Senate of the Oliy Majlis of the Republic of Uzbekistan, Ms Carin Jämtin, Director General, Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA), and Mr Raimund Jehle, FAO Regional Programme Leader, FAO Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia. They underlined the importance of the CFS future Guidelines and their support to their implementation once agreed by CFS in October 2022.

There was general consensus by participants that the Zero Draft is comprehensive and clear, but many of them identified some additional key challenges and gaps as, among others, the importance of taking a systemic, holistic approach to gender equality and food security – moving away from the siloization of issues – and several calls to be ambitious and aim high in the aspirations of the Guidelines. For example, participants highlighted the need for more reference to gender-responsive budgeting as a policy strategy and for more language on justice in the Guidelines, and for the active engagement of boys and men in gender transformative food security and nutrition interventions, in order to raise awareness and promote changes in behavior. The need to integrate a social norms’ focus in all policy areas was also raised.

On the second day, the plenary discussion dedicated to Part 3 of the Zero Draft started with themes/sections 3.2, 3.3. and 3.5, and then moved to other sections of interest.

On section 3.2, “Elimination of violence and discrimination against women for improved food security and nutrition”, issues and gaps raised by participants included prevention, intersectionality and violence based on sexual orientation. In fact, many participants stressed that the Guidelines need more of an intersectional approach that reflects and embraces diversity, including indigenous and rural women, age, ethnicity, race and disability; and more recognition of gender-based violence in all its forms.

Technical and vocational education and access to financial services were at the center of the discussion on section 3.3: “Access to education, capacity building, training, knowledge and information services”. Some interesting examples to inspire policy areas were presented from Uzbekistan, Belarus and North Macedonia.

With regards to section 3.5, “Access to and control over natural and productive resources”, the main issues raised were around property and land rights, resilience and intersectionality.

The discussions are documented in the Co-Chairs’ Summary available on the dedicated webpage in English, and in Russian in the forthcoming days.

We would also like to take this opportunity to thank those who have already contributed to the online consultation, providing us with their insightful feedback. We look forward to receiving further input, which will be crucial in the process of developing the Guidelines.

Françoise Trine, Marina Calvino and Alyson Brody
CFS Secretariat


[1] The keynote address was delivered by Ms Malika Kadyrkhanova, Head of the Commission on Gender Equality of the Republic  of Uzbekistan.

Conference: Triple Burden of Malnutrition in Pakistan

Breaking the Silos Between the World of Undernutrition and NCDs

The call for abstracts for this conference is open until October 30th 2021.

Visit www.rdn.pnds.org for more information including how to submit your abstract.

The 2nd PNDS International Conference will take place in Karachi, Pakistan from March 11th – 13th 2022. This 2.5 day conference, supported by IUNS and The Nutrition Society, aims to bring together researchers and practitioners from the fields of early years undernutrition interventions and NCD’s to exchange knowledge and build connections.

Pakistan is facing a triple burden of malnutrition with unabated rates of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies and infections in younger population and rising burden of hypertension and diabetes in adult population. The scientific literature suggests that there is a link between undernutrition in early years and NCD’s in later life. However many working in practice are unaware of the synergy and interconnections between the two areas.

SCOPE School 2021

SCOPE School: Revisiting the bi-directional relationship between obesity and CVD across the life course

The third SCOPE School Global of 2021, will be hosted by World Obesity held in conjunction with the World Heart Federation (WHF). On 27th-28th October they will be exploring the connections between CVD and obesity and considering clinical approaches to optimise treatment for patients presenting with these conditions. Speakers will also discuss potential barriers to effective treatment, the obesity paradox and the importance of supporting patients with obesity and CVD in making long-term lifestyle changes.

Recognising that obesity and CVD are associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality as well as reduced life expectancy, the overall objective of this event is to understand the clinical approaches that can help to optimise the treatment and care for people living with obesity and CVD.

The SCOPE School will supplement a new, six-module learning path entitled Obesity and CVD: A Complex Relationship which will be made available via SCOPE E-Learning in the coming months. All delegates are advised to take these modules in advance of attending the school.

Consultation for the development of the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Gender Equality and Women’s and Girls’ Empowerment in the Context of Food Security and Nutrition

FAO Global Forum on Food Security and Nutrition • FSN Forum

The “Consultation for the development of the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Gender Equality and Women’s and Girls’ Empowerment in the Context of Food Security and Nutrition” has already received interesting contributions. Below you can read short summaries of these comments.

This online consultation invites you to share your views on the Zero Draft of the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Gender Equality and Women’s and Girls’ Empowerment in the Context of Food Security and Nutrition.

It is part of a consultative process that also includes six regional consultations of which the first one, the CFS Gender Regional Consultation for Latin America and the Caribbean, took place this week. Below you will find a note from the facilitators of this online consultation, in which they provide a short overview of this regional event.

Please visit the FSN Forum website to read the introduction to the online consultation and the discussion questions in English, Español, Français, Русский, 中文 or  العربية, and to post your contribution in any of these six languages.

There is also an ongoing “Call for sharing experiences and good practices in the use and application of the CFS-RAI”, which is also facilitated by the CFS Secretariat.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact FSN at fsn-moderator@fao.org.

The FSN Forum Team look forward to receiving your precious feedback!

TO PARTICIPATE – send your contribution to FSN-moderator@fao.org or post it on www.fao.org/fsnforum

NOTE FROM THE FACILITATORS

The CFS Gender Regional Consultation for Latin America and the Caribbean took place on 21-22 September. The Consultation was very well attended with close to 100 participants from countries of the region participating in the event at any time and more following the webcast. All constituent groups contributed to the plenary discussions: representatives from governments, UN System, civil society, research institutions, private sector and others, sharing precious information on challenges and potential solutions. This was the first one of a series of six consultations planned to take place in September-November 2021.

The objective of the CFS regional consultations is to align the future CFS Voluntary Guidelines on Gender Equality and Women’s and Girls’ Empowerment in the Context of Food Security and Nutrition with national and regional priorities and needs. The main background document for the consultation, the Zero Draft of the Guidelines, was presented by Ms Tanja Grén (Finland) and Mr Tomas Duncan (Panama), Co-Chairs appointed by the CFS Bureau to facilitate the policy convergence process.

H.E. Ms Beatriz Argimon, Vice President of Uruguay, delivered the first keynote. She was congratulated for tirelessly championing the rights of rural women, including the rights to food and nutrition. Mr Berdegué, Regional Representative of FAO for Latin America and the Caribbean delivered a keynote on behalf of FAO, IFAD and WFP, sharing impressive statistics on the dramatic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on poverty and food security and nutrition. Finally, Ms Maria Noel Vaeza, UN Women’s Regional Director for the Americas and the Caribbean, stressed the fact that empowering women and girls was an effective way of improving nutrition, not only of women but of all members of their family. The three keynote speakers underlined the importance of the CFS future Guidelines and their support to their implementation once agreed by CFS in October 2022.

CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED

Srikanthi Bodapati

Nutrition and Public Health Specialist, India

Srikanthi comments on section 3.8 of the Zero Draft, “Women and men’s ability to make strategic choices for healthy diets and good nutrition”, and suggests including some additional aspects in the section’s problem statement. She discusses, for instance, how broader social factors can deprive women and young girls of education and nutrition, referring to forced early marriage and influence of family members on women’s and girls’ reproductive health choices.

Read the full contribution

Asikaralu Okafor

Maklumy Technology Services Limited, Nigeria

Asikaralu provides feedback on section 3.2 of the Zero Draft: “Elimination of violence and discrimination against women for improved food security and nutrition”. She refers to the situation in Nigeria, where women experience psychological and economic violence due to patriarchy. Women often do not have full ownership of farmland or are not allowed to use the profits they earn for personal needs. With regard to section 3.3, “Access to education, capacity building, training, knowledge and information services”, Asikaralu argues that child/early marriage is an age-long tradition that falls outside the sphere of influence of civilization and religion.

Read the full contribution

Atika Marouf

Seed Development Project funded by IFAD, Sudan

Atika points to the need for nutrition awareness raising programs and training on income generation activities for women.

Read the full contribution

Santosh Kumar Mishra

Population Education Resource Centre, Department of Lifelong Learning and Extension (Previously known as: Department of Continuing and Adult Education and Extension Work), S. N. D. T. Women’s University, Mumbai (Retired: on June 30, 2020), India

Santosh proposes to include the aspect of “family life education” (FLE) in Part 2 of the Zero Draft. He discusses what FLE should look like in practice, pointing out that it should be provided to both boys and girls, and that it should cover the following broad subject areas: 1) negotiation skills; 2) communication skills, and 3) values for healthy and responsible living. The aim of FLE would be to equip boys and girls with the skills needed for taking right and rational decisions in all relevant matters throughout life. Based on his professional experience, Santosh argues that the traditional tools to support women’s empowerment that are suggested by policy makers often do not have the desired outcome, and that FLE could promote the needed changes.                   

Read the full contribution

Violet Chanza Black

World Food Programme, Cameroon

According to Violet, the Guidelines should feature a more comprehensive discussion on including women and girls in the development of climate change adaptation skills, with a particular focus on digital technologies. In this context, one should take into account existing gender gaps in terms of skills, and access to information and training.

Read the full contribution

Second Circular Available: 22nd IUNS-ICN International Congress of Nutrition in Tokyo, Japan, December 6-11, 2022

The second circular for the IUNS-ICN is now available.

The 22nd IUNS-ICN is a fantastic opportunity to bring the international nutrition community together to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee, as the first ICN was held in 1946.

The ICN will take place in the Tokyo International Forum, an iconic state-of-the-art conference venue in the heart of Tokyo.  Delegates have the chance to not only experience the board scientific knowledge gained by attending the Congress but also an opportunity to fully immerse in Japanese culture, history, entertainment and cuisine.

ICD2021 Virtual Congress

The International Congress of Dietetics (ICD2021) virtual congress ran from 1 to 3 September 2021 and as reported by IUNS Council member, Professor Ali Dhansay, was a great success. Approximately 800 delegates attended this IUNS sponsored event. Professor Dhansay, served as a member of the Local Organising Committee, representing the NSSA (Nutrition Society of South Africa) together with Dr Elize Symington (chair of NSSA). The NSSA partnered with ADSA (Association for Dietetics in South Africa) to host the congress – both organizations are contributing members of the South African National Committee for IUNS.  The ICD falls under the International Confederation of Dietetic Associations (ICDA), which is an Affiliated Body to IUNS.

2021 Zhong Guan Cun (ZGC) Forum

The Chinese Nutrition Society is hosting the 2021 Zhong Guan Cun (ZGC) Forum. The 2021 ZGC Forum will be held in Beijing, China from September 24 to 28 2021. With the theme of “intelligence, health, and carbon neutrality”, the forum will touch on leading edge and hotspot topics, such as the digital economy, artificial intelligence, life and health, science and technology and carbon neutrality.

Nutrigenetics: Translation into Clinical and Nutritional Practice Webinar

Free Webinar | Nutrigenetics: Translation into Clinical and Nutritional Practice

7 Sep 2021, 14:00 (CEST) | 8:00am EDT | 8:00pm CST Asia


Genetic Testing, Personalized Nutrition, Precision Nutrition, Metabolic Health, Brain Health, Obesity

This FREE webinar features contribution and speakers from the IUNS Precision Nutrition Task Force and is supported by the IUNS Committee for Capacity Development.  

The number of participants to the live session is limited but the recording will be made available on Sciforum shortly afterwards. Registrations with academic institutional email addresses will be prioritized.

ABOUT THE WEBINAR

The human genome contains a huge amount of information. Information variability among human subjects is even greater. We are beginning to grasp this genetic variability and its implications for health, behavior, capacities (physical and intellectual), aging, and responses to different types of interventions. Even if still in its infancy, the development of nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics is already providing concrete examples regarding the interaction of genetics, nutrition, and health outcomes whose translation into clinical and nutritional practice begins to be feasible and advisable. This knowledge – in the form, for instance, of genetic risk scores covering known variability in relevant gene sets, or the identification of single genetic variants or haplotypes that are consistently linked to phenotypic traits or responses to diet – is instrumental to preventive and therapeutic approaches against nutrition-related disease conditions through personalized dietary choices and recommendations. Importantly, at the same time, the novel knowledge generated is helping to advance our understanding of human biology and physiology. As Editor-in-Chief of the Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics section of the journal Nutrients, it is my pleasure and my honor to have reunited, in this Webinar, three outstanding, scientists acknowledged worldwide in the field, who will show us relevant examples emerging from their research and the momentum of the area such that we can envisage the possibilities, and limitations, open to us.

Prof. Dr. María Luisa Bonet